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If you break the racial barrier, you'll have to answer for it later

It's interesting what doesn't get mentioned, how the evils of imperialism are never demonstrated except maybe a single panel; you'd think the worst thing about imperialism is that sometimes it kills imperialists' children. View all 4 comments. Apr 23, Kathryn rated it it was ok Shelves: mystery , graphic-novel-manga , fantasy. First, I am a huge Carey fan. Second, I bought this on a whim. Third, the book is overrated, mainly due to an abundance of cliches. There were so many, I was barely able to close the book. The cliches kept coming to life, crawling from the pages, and forcing me to relive bad literature.

At least I am happier than ever to not have read the Harry Potter series. The Unwritten is supposed to be a mystery but the reader knows right from the start what is going on. Tommy Taylor is real and there's a s First, I am a huge Carey fan. Tommy Taylor is real and there's a secret society involved and stories are important. La de da. I did not like any of the characters. I did not like the Harry Potter homages. I did not like the slasher-horror tangent. I did not like the predictability, the lack of plot progression, the annoying main character, the forced classic literature references, or Kipling's escapade.

I finished this yesterday and I had to think hard about how the book ended. Cliffhangers should be memorable. If you are wondering why I am rating 2 stars, I guess it's because the writing was ok and I just cannot bring myself to rate 1 star but I can not recommend this and I will not be reading the rest of the series. Unless it's free and I have nothing else to read, which will never happen. Dec 06, Ashley rated it it was amazing Recommended to Ashley by: Felicia.

Shelves: addictive , what-s-this-art-thing-all-about-yo , graphic-novels-and-comics , speculative , murder-most-foul , orphalins , books-about-writers , treasure-and-adventure , favorites , folklore-and-mythology. December Ughhhh, I need to write a review of this but I don't wanna. Oh, I'm feeling so whiny today. But it's hard!

Writing a review of this is hard! It's too smart and I have too much to say! I said in my original review that I might come back later and give this five stars, and indeed that has happened. I've only read through Vol. Everything just hangs together so well! I love it when that happens. It's so satisfying. As for the book itself, this is the first volume in The Unwritten series, which is now finished, hence why I'm re-reading the first six, and tackling the rest now.

It was getting to be too much to remember waiting six months in between books. So now I have seven all new ones to read and I'm so happy. This series is incredibly hard to describe. It's about the power of stories, essentially, but the way it does what it does is just so NEAT. It's a story only a graphic novel can really capture. It goes back and forth between current events, illustrations of the famous book series the main character was the "inspiration" for, historical flashbacks, and pages entirely made up of internet chats, texts, clippings, etc.

It's basically brain candy for story nerds. Like, how cool it is that Tom carries a literal map made out of literary history, or how much fun it is to watch him question what came first, himself, or the book series that made him famous. Like A. Milne did with his son Christopher Robin, Tom Taylor's father supposedly did with him, only he and the series achieved a level of popularity that surpasses Harry Potter which does still exist in this universe. Only Tom's father disappeared when he was a teenager, leaving the 14th and final book of the Tommy Taylor series unfinished.

Now, things are happening. Is Tom Taylor who his father claimed he was? Is he a character brought to life from the pages of a book? And who are these mysterious men and their cabal who seek to control the most prominent authorial voices in the world, or silence them if they can't? And the artwork! Oh, it's delicious. I highly recommend this series, and I can't wait to finish it and finally see what happens. February Of course I'm going to love this.

It's about the power of stories, and I'm such a huge sucker for that. I don't want to spoil anything plot-wise, but it reminds me of Lev Grossman's The Magicians , except way better, and in the family of comics, Fables would probably be its closest relative, like a second cousin or something. I was actually pretty close to giving this five stars, and maybe in the future I'll come back and do so, but for now, four stars, because I want to wait and see how it all turns out.

Right now I think it has fantastic potential. In these first five issues collected under the title "Tommy Taylor and the Bogus Identity," itself a meta reference to JK Rowling's Harry Potter titles , Carey and Gross manage to create a sense of things happening just under the surface of your comprehension, but because it's completely serialized, the whole picture isn't available to me yet.

On top of all of that, the artwork is just beautiful: the panels, the colors, and particularly the covers. If you are a fan of stories for the sake of stories, or graphic novels as a genre at all, you should run out and get this. Oct 20, GrilledCheeseSamurai Scott rated it it was amazing Shelves: comics , favorites , vertigo. I have already read the first few volumes of this series back in the day when they were first published. However, that was when I wasn't using Goodreads to its fullest potential and just slapped a star rating on it and called it a day!

I use Goodreads differently now and since this series is going to be wrapping up this year I figured it was time to dive back into this story and start back at the beginning and give it the Goodreads attention that it deserves. This first volume is fantastic! More o I have already read the first few volumes of this series back in the day when they were first published. More or less it asks the question, 'what would happen if a Harry Potter like character were to come from the pages and into the real world? You get little hints, slight glimpses of layers upon layers of how intricate this story is actually going to be.

Mike Carey is very subtle in laying down the tracks for what will later on be a very twisty mammoth of a story. I love the little 'Tommy Taylor storybook outtakes. They add a whimsy feel to the rest of the darker storyline! And it does get dark. I'm so happy to be diving back into this series.

It was a treat when I began reading it back in the day - and I am happy to see that it hasn't lost a single beat of its magic since! This first volume is a wonderful introduction in what becomes quite a sprawling epic.

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Can't wait to see where it all takes me. View 1 comment. Jan 08, Sesana rated it really liked it Shelves: comics , fantasy. What a weirdly wonderful idea. A fantasy character crossing into reality isn't exactly a new concept, I admit. It's classic wish fulfillment, after all. It's the execution of the concept here that makes it interesting.

But it does seem to be developing kind of slowly. Tom Taylor isn't aware that he's fictional, and it's taking far, far longer than it did for me to come to the same conclusion. I know, I know, people in Dracula don't know that they're in Dracula. Maybe it feels slower than it is b What a weirdly wonderful idea.

Maybe it feels slower than it is because the slasher subplot kind of bored me. And though I really liked the last issue, a sort of digression into a secret version of Rudyard Kipling's biography, it falls at an odd place, coming after a serious cliffhanger in Tom's story. And there was the problematic element of glossing over any consequence of imperialism aside from the apparently horrible fact that rich white boys might die in battle in foreign lands. Given that it was meant to be Kipling's own words at the time, I tried to let it go, but it just didn't sit right.

I think this review hasn't sounded as positive as I would have liked. But I really do love this concept, and I'm fascinated to see where it's going. There are hints, still vague, that fictional geography will become important, and I love that stuff. I want to see where this is going. View 2 comments. Aug 01, Danielle The Book Huntress Back to the Books rated it really liked it Recommends it for: book lovers, dark fiction readers. Shelves: yearly-reading-challenge , epistolary-narrative , horror , s-club-challenge , celebrity-in-the-limelight , books-about-books , famous-literary-historical-characte , dark-fantasy , first-in-series , favorites.

The Unwritten strikes me as being somehow 'impressive'. It's hard to clarify what I mean, but the idea of it and the execution was very well done. It delves into the very fruitful literary territory of metafiction, where reality and fiction intersect. I find I truly enjoy metafiction, probably because of being such a lifelong bookworm and having my head stuck in a book for most of that life since I was four. In the case of Tommy Taylor, it's a painful intersection.

His father is a famous noveli The Unwritten strikes me as being somehow 'impressive'. His father is a famous novelist of children's books in the vein of Harry Potter who suddenly disappeared. Tommy is left depending on the uncertain income from coasting on his identity as Tommy Taylor, the eponymous character of the books his father wrote. When a lady shows up at a comic book convention and challenges his identity, the stuff hits the fan, and the adoring fans of the books become hateful, vengeance-seeking stalkers.

Tommy's life implodes. But things only get worse, when he develops enemies that hail from the so-called mythical landscape of the books. One of the things I liked the best about this graphic novel was the illustrations. It is clean and elegant. The lettering is also well done and distinctive. My eyes wanted to stay on the page and observe every detail, whereas with some graphic novels, there is too much to look at so I pick and choose , and some aspects of the frames seem to fade into the woodwork because they are deemed less important.

This book is a great midpoint where neither clarity or detail is compromised. I also liked the prose and the storytelling. I felt sorry for Tommy. He really got a rough deal being who he was, and in effect powerless to change his life. I hope that he does gain some agency and authority in his life situation.

I do have to say I didn't care much for some aspects of one of the sections. The idea of tackling horror conventions since they were at the house at Lake Geneva in Switzerland, where Mary Shelley and apparently John Milton earlier wrote the famous masterpiece they are known for, was a good one. I just didn't care for the gory turn of the story.

I think it pricks a sore spot I have about the horror genre in general--the sacrifice of story and genuine narrative content for splatter and gore. I understood the purpose of this, but it just seemed gratuitous although I admit it was still tastefully done.


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The last section was rather odd initially. I didn't get why Rudyard Kipling was the narrator, until well into the story, and then the lightbulb came on. It ties in very well with this developing and expansive story and endows it with increased sense of threat and risk. I still have a lot of questions, and I want to keep reading this series because it has my interest and attention.

I hope that Tommy will come to understand his troublesome situation and discover the hero within. I'd recommend this novel to lovers of books and literature in its various forms. Aug 09, Alexa rated it liked it Shelves: comics-n-graphic-novels. Around 3. Tom's father created the wonderful "Tommy Taylor" novels think Harry Potter and he based the main character on Tom: Same name, same features But of course, he actually is. The intro to this volume is really good. I did not like how alike the "Tommy Taylor" fake novel was to "Harry Potter", yes you can call it an homage or whatever. But did he had to have round glasses, black hair and two friends, a girl that looks really brainy and a boy with reddish hair?

I mean, look at them! During the second half of the volume strange things start to happen, and we begin the weird part, there's lot of info thrown around that I'm sure I'll understand later, but right now is just a bit too complicated for my taste. At least it's interesting enough that I want to read the next one. The art is okay. It's reminds me of the artwork of some issues of Fables. There's a backstory issue at the end which I have to admit I found quite boring! Jan 22, Miriam rated it really liked it Recommends it for: fantasy nerds.

Shelves: graphic , fantasy , books , cover-love. So many allusions, so little space. Dec 18, Ryan Mishap rated it it was amazing Shelves: graphic-novel. I'm re-posting this because none of my friends, besides Tracy, have marked it as to read or sought it out.

Don't miss out! What if Harry Potter were based on the author's son? And then the author disappeared--it has been ten years. And the son hits the conventions for money and was tired of being called by the fictional character's name and then it turns out that his father may have stolen him from his real parents and even though events around the world are grim all anyone cares about is this fr I'm re-posting this because none of my friends, besides Tracy, have marked it as to read or sought it out.

And the son hits the conventions for money and was tired of being called by the fictional character's name and then it turns out that his father may have stolen him from his real parents and even though events around the world are grim all anyone cares about is this fraudulent son who has soiled their beloved books and when he's kidnapped and nearly killed he then becomes a messiah-like figure but meanwhile a mysterious someone sends a dangerous man to set plans in motion that end with a bloody killing spree and--yes, a little breathless this leaves me, such a tantalizing start to the story.

I liked it for sure. Then I got to the last story. And I loved it. Highly recommended. Apr 27, Elspeth rated it did not like it Shelves: library , twenty-fifteen , graphic-novels. This one was lost on me. I am sure it had deeper meaning with all it's correlation to Harry Potter, but I found myself not caring. Jan 05, Katiria rated it really liked it Shelves: favorites-books.

Ohh my this graphic novel was so good for me, I know not every reader loves this book and I totally understand why. But I absolutely love and enjoy everything about it. This graphic novel was another Litsy recommendation that a friend of my rec on Litsy, that I had too give it a shot. Since I am in a graphic novel binge right now I wanted to give it a shot.

And I am so glad and happy that I did, now I don't want to go into any details about this amazing graphic novel without getting too spoiler. But it is about Tom Taylor who's fathers is an author that has written a book series like Harry Potter esque, with his son's name in it. The fan's actually believe Tom is the actual real fictional character Tommy from his father fantasy books, and Tom just wants too live outside from the spotlight and live a normal life.

Without fans hounding him about if he is truly the real Tommy in the books and what happened too his father, who mysteriously disappeared almost a year ago. Now Tom goes through a lot of crazy stuff in this book, that I don't want too say because spoiler. But the stuff he goes through changes his life upside down for the worst though. Especially after that insane cliffhanger ending. I am going to leave it off here because I don't want too say too much, but my favorite part in this book was the art style.

The art was absolutely amazing and stunning at the same time that I can't wait too read the next volume next! The story was different and refreshing that I never read a graphic novel quite like this one before, that I was on pins and needles while reading it. All and all I absolutely love and enjoy everything about the Unwritten series, that I can't wait to continue on reading the next book The Unwritten, Vol. Jan 14, Brooke rated it really liked it Shelves: graphic-novels-read. A truly, truly awesome concept about authors being manipulated by some mysterious group to write stories that magically have an effect on the outside world.

The main character, Tom, is the son of a missing world-famous children's author - or maybe he's actually Tommy Taylor, the main character from his dad's books, summoned to life by his dad's prose. The story has some familiar threads in it I'm reminded of a certain Twilight Zone episode and Christopher Golden's Strangewood but it feels fres A truly, truly awesome concept about authors being manipulated by some mysterious group to write stories that magically have an effect on the outside world. The story has some familiar threads in it I'm reminded of a certain Twilight Zone episode and Christopher Golden's Strangewood but it feels fresh and fascinating all on its own.

I think that the addition of the shadowy group and the point-of-view being one of the characters rather than the author help with that. Jan 31, Teresa rated it really liked it Recommended to Teresa by: rhea. Graphic novels, or comics, are not my primary reading medium, but I enjoyed this and look forward to the sequel. While there's a violent section in the middle that's not my thing though I understand its purpose , there were enough literary references and literary geography as the main character calls it to more than keep my interest.

A back story that stretches back to the 19th century is clever and has me wondering what will happen next. The illustrations advance the story and unlike The Lea Graphic novels, or comics, are not my primary reading medium, but I enjoyed this and look forward to the sequel. This review will not have intended spoilers, but still it regards my on-going reading of the series so far I'm in volume 6. Please be advised.

It remained in my reading list for a long time, for some reason it did not seem appealing. This does touch, in some points, in what being world wide famous could be about but, besid This review will not have intended spoilers, but still it regards my on-going reading of the series so far I'm in volume 6. This does touch, in some points, in what being world wide famous could be about but, besides not focusing on it as main subject, the insights and coherence are there. The series is quite amazing, balancing the back story with the individual volumes, and even issues.

The way it introduces mini-naratives and constantly feeds the big picture is masterful. It's great that it is a real colaboration, a work of two talents, and not just a visual artist ilustrating a writer's script. There is a coherence, a style that gets reinforced and even allows for interludes, variations on the themes presented, many plays on the way this story can be told and visualized. Conspiracy theories abund, nowadays. They seem to be a sink hole, in a culture that has run out of ideologies, they say.

And so popular culture uses those paranoid narratives a lot, in different ways. But if in Jonathan Hickman's work the conspiracy, the puppets and the puppet master, the paranoia about some major thing behind the scenes seems to be the theme itself, it's not always the case with other authors. Matt Kindt's work is all about the art and the atmosphere, not just about creating that anxious relation with the "truth out there".

There is an idea, a theme, but the conspirators who move the strings are "just" part of the story. So the theme here forgive me for constantly being vague, so I can avoid spoilers is not at all the same as in Eco's novel. Pendulum", but again in Brown's work it is the conspiracy that takes front stage. Here the central metaphore, about stories, narratives, is brilliant. It's an evolving premise, since every details added to the big story makes the initial insights deslocate and morph.

This last bit is still something I need to think about more, since it's strange even to me. I will defenitely try to read all of it. Quite an intriguing and enjoyable read. Mar 03, Devann rated it really liked it Shelves: g-fantasy-realistic , c-dl , t-graphic-novel , zmagical-march , star , a-adult , sg-magic. Ok, I'm gonna try to get out a really quick review because I want to go on and read volume 2! I really enjoyed this and the only reason it got 4 stars instead of 5 is because I don't often give the first volume in a graphic novel series 5 stars since it's generally just a lot of scene setting.

The basic concept is like 'what if Harry Potter actually got transported to our world as a child and JK Rowling raised him but lied and said he was her son' May 18, Robert rated it really liked it Shelves: xseason , comics-graphics. A high concept comic that I look forward to reading more of.

Feb 26, Liz B rated it really liked it Shelves: comic-books , fantasy , library , graphicnovels. And that superlative reading experience introduced me to the Sandman graphic novels. Until then I think I had been completely unaware that comic books did anything other than superheroes, Donald Duck, and Archie.

So I liked Sandman but couldn't afford to buy it back then, and FYI, it is never available in used bookstores. And I wasn't much of a library user back then, and I guess it never occurred to me that a library might carry graphic novels. It's hard to break in if you're not part of that world. I spent ages in a comic book shop with my son over Christmas break, and I found zero--nothing--zippo--that caught my own interest. And I was willing to be interested!

Fortunately, I asked a librarian yesterday--how can you search for graphic novels for adults? He showed me, and I found this--only because I was looking for graphic novels where the first volume was in my branch, so I could check it out right away. This long personal story is just to clarify what serendipity this was.

I have never, ever, ever heard of this series, or of Mike Carey.

The Unwritten, Vol. Apocalypse by Mike Carey

But it is so up my alley--the borders between reality and fiction are blurred in ways that are confusing for our foul-mouthed main character but delightful for someone who reads and reads and reads. Our hero's father wrote an incredibly popular series of books about a boy wizard and yeah, you're supposed to think of Harry Potter named after him. It confuses people. It confuses him.

And then the last comic in the collection offers some tantalizing insight into the weird backstory of storywriting--and I'm hooked. Fortunately 8 all 8?? I have checked them all out. View all 3 comments. Readers also enjoyed. Graphic Novels Comics. About Mike Carey. And I really loved the Hundred Acre Woods rip-off at the end! There was a menacing feel to everything, but that rabbit's creative swearing had me laughing my ass off! This may not be everyone's cuppa, but I'm looking forward to more.

View all comments. Dec 01, Marpapad rated it liked it. This volume, unfortunately, did not improve my views on the "the Unwritten" series. I still cannot relate to any character and feel entirely engrossed in the story probably due to its complexity. I wanted to love this series because it sounded so interesting, but I just like it. Hopefully the third volume will change my mind. Dec 30, Patrick rated it it was ok. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. Spoilers here. Fair warning. You better have a really good reason for killing a couple children in your book. It's not just that killing kids in a story is mostly out of bounds. It's not just that as a parent, some biological switch in my head has been flipped that makes me extremely sensitive to kid-peril. Though it does. It's that if you something like this, it better be focal to the story. You better fucking DO Right. You better fucking DO it. You better fucking make that shit count. I better cry their names to the unfeeling sky in the middle of the night because you've torn out my heart.

When it happens here, it just feels I found it Perhaps most importantly, if you're writing a story in which you're going to kill off some kids, you have to telegraph that for your readers. If Joe Abercrombie kills off some kids in First Law 4, I'm not going to be surprised because he's painted a grim fucking picture of the world we're visiting.

This book didn't prepare me for that. The book was strange, and smart, and satirical, and kinda winked at the reader a little bit. Kid killing came at me out of left field, and it really damaged my trust in the story. The only reason I'm not more viciously angry here is that there's some ameliorating factors in book 8.

I'll mention them in my review of that volume. Jun 20, Teresa rated it really liked it Recommended to Teresa by: rhea. This installment started off as a 3, but picked up considerably by the middle, turning it into a 4 for me. The questions of the nature of narrative in our lives, the un truthfulness of stories and whether the veracity or lack thereof makes a difference using the The Song of Roland as a reference point , and the effect on the work itself when it's been 'tortured' into its opposite by those who twist it into something it isn't for their own purposes all elevate this story. The last few pages con This installment started off as a 3, but picked up considerably by the middle, turning it into a 4 for me.

The last few pages concerning a character who's been written as a rabbit into a children's story that he's trying to escape from is both creepy and funny, but with meaning. What is true? Who and what is 'real'? And what does that word even mean? I look forward to the next installment. As a side note, I recommend reading the short introduction afterwards, not before, as it made not one bit of sense to me reading it beforehand. View all 5 comments. So, in this volume we have: A typical prison tale.

Children that can't differentiate fantasy from fiction. Rocket launchers. Nazi stormtroopers. A foul mouthed bunny rabbit. And this is all just pretty much scratching the surface. I really enjoyed the whole 'power of the story' message that gets hammered home over and over again in this one. There is power in words - there is power in a story. This seems to very much be the backbone of what is happening in this series thus far. Two volumes deep and I am totally on board. I loved this volume. Feb 21, Sesana rated it liked it Shelves: comics , fantasy.

The first few issues are a bit of a slog. Tom is now in prison, after being framed for a mass murder. And really, I just wanted to get those over with. Once he escapes, into a ghostly reality built around a book that's been twisted, the story picks up considerably. This is the sort of thing that I'd been hoping to see from Unwritten, thoughtful metafiction.

The last issue is a sort of side story, about a man trapped inside a Beatrix Potter-like animal world, as a rabbit. It can be very funny, an The first few issues are a bit of a slog. It can be very funny, and it's actually one of the more thoughtful issues in the collection. But this is the second time that Carey has followed up a cliffhanger with an unrelated story. Reading it in trades, it doesn't bother me so much. But it would definitely have irritated me if I was trying to read the monthly issues as they were released. View 2 comments. Feb 17, Ashley rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-about-writers , treasure-and-adventure , post-modern , i-vant-to-drink-your-blood , addictive , what-s-this-art-thing-all-about-yo , graphic-novels-and-comics , fantasy , speculative , nerd-lit.

December "When a book is read, an irrevocable thing happens--a murder, followed by an imposture. The story in the mind murders the story on the page, and takes its place. Things it can't acknowledge. Truths it can imply or flirt with, but never say out loud. Let me go! And then, if you do that. You have to pretend you don't know. To suppress the things you learned as you grew up.

To slip back into the garden by being small enough to walk under the door. But you can't make the scary things disappear. You can only lock them away where nobody sees them. I'd forgotten how everything ties together, how detailed it all was, and how all the details are so very, very strange.

Tom Taylor has been extradited to a French prison for a massacre at a famous literary landmark, a crime he didn't commit. Even though he hasn't been tried yet, the court of public has already found him guilty. He's being framed by a shadowy enemy. He doesn't know who they are or what they want, but it all seems to be connected to his missing father, and Tom's identity, which he is having a very hard time accepting, despite appearances by a "fake" flying cat from a book series, a real life incarnation of Frankenstein's monster, and a magical doorknob that opens doors that aren't there.

Along with a journalist who embedded himself in the jail to write about Tom, and Lizzie, the three break out of prison when their enemies break in. But that's just what happens. The real meat of this story isn't the what but the HOW. And the how is gorgeous and unique and really unexpected. Tom's story, which is strange enough, is mixed in with all these other layers.

News reports, as the outside world changes as the story does, as the shadowy cabal tries to change the story, to change people's thoughts. And then we have the story of the warden, whose children love the Tommy Taylor books past the point of reason. It all comes together in this weird meditation on human darkness, and the origin of monsters, who are stories gone wrong, betrayed by their creators. The last several issues depart from the real world as the trio heads through a doorway into an old book called "Jud Suss", and then a COMPLETE departure as we see a rabbit who isn't really a rabbit, trying to escape from the story-prison he's living in, a children's book series he was placed in by Tom's father.

It's very bizarre and darkly funny, and caps the whole thing off with the second passage I quoted above. And it's so hard to write about! I don't even know how I'm going to write reviews for all the rest of the volumes. I just want to zoom straight through. But write I shall. I shall do it all for you, peasants. March I wasn't sure how I felt about this series after Vol. After Vol. That feeling is "awesome. Half the fun is experiencing the ride yourself. Go out and buy Vols. It's the whole package: fun and intellectually engaging.

The Unwritten is basically like the entire reason God invented post-modernism. May 07, Tim The Enchanter rated it liked it Shelves: a-touch-of-fantasy , comic , stars. There is no denying that these books are cerebral. There are many layers that the reader can pull back and many connections to be made. One one hand we have Tommy's life mirroring, in many ways, the books for which he was the inspiration. On another level, Tommy is within the orbit of anther well known tale that gives context.

Beyond this, Tommy is part of a story that is currently being written. While I find this to the most appealing aspect of this series, the execution leaves something to be There is no denying that these books are cerebral. While I find this to the most appealing aspect of this series, the execution leaves something to be desired. There are so many layers they are often insufficiently dealt with. Many layers mean a complex puzzle and a maze for your mind.

On its most basic level, I find the main plotline to be only mildly entertaining, As such, I cannot rate it any higher than 3. Aug 14, Laurel rated it it was amazing Shelves: The people who wrote this series are mad geniuses! If this series keeps up this level of writing, it should become one of the greatest series ever written. It's an astonishingly good story! Mar 04, Devann rated it really liked it Shelves: sg-magic , g-fantasy-realistic , a-adult , t-graphic-novel , zmagical-march , star , c-dl.

Continuing to really enjoy this series, getting a few answers but also definitely more questions as well. Overall I feel like it's a very interesting world and I just love the book-within-a-book trope so I'm definitely here for it especially since it has so many layers in this particular series.

Also I always have to mention this sooner or later but I feel like Carey has a very good grasp of story structure in general, and also specifically with regard to comics in that he really knows how to se Continuing to really enjoy this series, getting a few answers but also definitely more questions as well. Also I always have to mention this sooner or later but I feel like Carey has a very good grasp of story structure in general, and also specifically with regard to comics in that he really knows how to set up a story to work well within a single volume.

A lot of times writers will string out an arc over several volumes or have it start in one volume but finish in the next and Carey seems like he always has things planned out very well and separated in a way that makes sense. Also his one-shot side-stories always feel incredibly relevant, unlike a lot of other comics. I will leave you for now with this panel, which has no real significance but made me laugh Mar 09, Kate rated it liked it Shelves: , age-adult , graphic-novels , comic-books , age-ya.

Tom Taylor, found alone at the scene of a massacre at the Villa Diodati, is shipped off to prison in France. The prison warden's two children are intense fans of the Tommy Taylor books and the warden plots to off Tommy to spare them from seeing their fallen idol. Tom begins having visions straight out of "La Chanson de Roland," and with the help of his cellmate Savoy a reporter and Lizzie Hexam, they escape the prison using a magic doorknob straight out of the Tommy Taylor books.

They end up i Tom Taylor, found alone at the scene of a massacre at the Villa Diodati, is shipped off to prison in France. They end up in a ghostly Nazi scene where Tom might be in mortal danger. A short chapter follows, about a bunny in a storybook who appears to have realized that he is trapped in an inane children's book. The bunny, Mr. Bun, has an extremely foul mouth and seeks to kill his creator, which is fairly amusing given that the illustrations look like something from Beatrix Potter. I loved the way the various works of literature are woven into the story. It's all about the power of words over reality.

The similarities between Tommy Taylor and Harry Potter continue to amass. I feel like the author is playing up the similarities to give the reader a sense of familiarity with the Tommy Taylor stories, so the reader can understand how obsessed two children could get over a book, but part of me wonders if it could be considered some kind of copyright infringement. Originally I had bought these graphic novels for the teen section of my library, because they were on the YALSA Great Graphic Novels for Teens list, and the concept seemed made for teens. The chapter about Mr. Bun the bunny, however, is making me wonder if this is the right decision.

In the first volume, there was some foul language and a bloody massacre. This volume takes it one step further with the use of the "c" word and the deaths of children That and the fact that it is "suggested for mature readers" on the back cover makes me think I ought to move it to the adult section - because honestly, the themes and references seem more adult to me as well.

It's a conundrum Dec 06, Felicia rated it really liked it Shelves: graphic-novels. The next installment of Unwritten deepens the mystery and becomes MORE intriguing as the motivation of the players in 1 get a bit clearer. The mechanics of reality inside this world get more interesting and I just can't wait for the next one!

Definitely darker and more subversive than I expected, this series is just soo good! View 1 comment. Sep 08, Danielle The Book Huntress Back to the Books rated it liked it Recommends it for: graphic novel readers looking for something different. Shelves: children-in-danger-harmed , metafiction , graphic-novel-comic-book , set-in-france , not-for-the-faint-of-heart , yearly-reading-challenge , bad-reputation , celebrity-in-the-limelight , s-club-challenge , famous-literary-historical-characte.

Eh, it's safe to say that I didn't like Inside Man as much as the first volume in this series. I still enjoy the idea, because metafiction is very fascinating to this avid reader. I just had too many moments of trying to figure out what where the writer is going with this book. I feel that this volume lacked the clarity I could see in the first book.

As before, the artwork is lovely. I liked the use of mixed media and textures to convey the story. The layout includes illustrated representations Eh, it's safe to say that I didn't like Inside Man as much as the first volume in this series. The layout includes illustrated representations of articles, screen caps from message boards, and images of news reporters, which add texture to the narrative.

The exploration of folklore and fiction versus reality. Tom is still a sympathetic character who has had his whole life uprooted and his character destroyed by the recent events in his life. This book seemed to much like a detour, and the tone was very dark. In fact, one part of this book irritated me enormously and I still don't see the point in writing that. Will I continue reading this? I want to know where this series is going, and since my library has these, I can check them out at my leisure and explore this series between other books.

I wasn't exactly a happy camper with Inside Man, but I think it does have something to offer a graphic novel reader. Jun 30, Tyler Hill rated it really liked it Shelves: read-in This started out a little slow to for me, partially because it has been probably a year since I'd read the first volume and needed to re-familiarize myself with the characters and concepts , and partially because it just gets more interesting and effective as the story moves along. With this series, Carey's developed the perfect way to balance commenting on the nature and power of "the story" while also weaving a powerful narrative himself.

The Unwritten, Vol. 11: Apocalypse

He's managing to have his cake and write about it too. After being framed for the murders that occurred in the second half of the first volume Tom Taylor who may-or-may not be the same person as the lead character in the books-with-a-book, Tommy Taylor, written by his mysterious and absent father , finds himself in prison in France. Before this volumes end, we'll see the prison turn into the site of another massacre, a trip will take place to a nightmarish Nazi dreamland, and we'll in a welcome change of pace visit a darkly humorous version of the Hundred Acre Woods.

Now, here's hoping I get around to Volume 3 before I forget what happened here. Nov 02, Steven rated it liked it Shelves: british , graphic-novel , fantasy-supernatural. Superior to the first volume as Carey begins to reveal the full extent of his vision and the story moves along at pace. Jan 14, 47Time rated it really liked it Shelves: comics-fantasy. Every good guy needs a bad guy to fight and Tom seems to get exactly that. He also seems to accept the magic that surrounds him. He is becoming more and more like the fictional Tommy by gathering a couple of allies and embarking on a quest for the truth.

Tom's trial is moved from Geneva to France while pretty much everyone starts hating the guy with a vengeange, even before his trial. Just like people to switch from seeing him as a messiah, straight to wanting to string him up in the street as a Every good guy needs a bad guy to fight and Tom seems to get exactly that. Just like people to switch from seeing him as a messiah, straight to wanting to string him up in the street as a pedophile. Lizzie is communicating with a disembodied Wilson about freeing Tom from jail by getting sent to its women's wing.

Tom's fame isn't helping him in jail, but he handles the inmates better than expected. The guards are another thing when they try to kill him. This lands Tom in solitary confinement. Tom's time in jail will be cut short by men ordered by mr.

Callendar to pay off the prison governor. The governor is a good man at heart who wants justice in the world, but has problems with his children who believe in Tommy's world a bit too much. The governor wants to get rid of Tom, but the men that bribe him kill indiscriminately and set fire to the prison. This releases the prisoners and starts a riot. Tom and Savoy, with Mingus' help, use the magic doorknob from his father's safe to reach Lizzie's cell. As they try to get away they meet the governor's kids who get buried under a crumbling wall by a rocket meant for Tom.

The governor is devastated and this allows Ambrosio, the villain from Tommy's books, to possess him. The door brings Tom, Lizzie and Savoy to Stuttgard in , but everyone around them is a ghost. The key is in the map, but Lizzie refuses to reveal more. After an encounter with Goebbels the three get back together and Tom fixes a canker, a story gone wrong because of beeing falsified in its retelling.

This reveals that another world that is somehow also connected to the real one. The mechanics aren't clear yet, but apparently a real person can be trapped in a fantasy land by being written into a story. In a similar way, a fictional character can be made real, like Lizzie. Jan 11, Katie rated it really liked it Shelves: graphic-novels. Books have power. They can sway thoughts, change minds, cause revolutions.

What if someone were to tap into all of that raw power? Tommy Taylor's father was a well-known author whose Harry-Potteresque books featured a main character also named Tommy Taylor. Because of this, Tommy himself is hugely famous and has been living off of fees from appearances and talk circuits since his father's disappearance many years ago. At the latest convention a woman openly states that Tommy is, in fact, the same Books have power.